Sunday, March 7, 2010

One Setup, Four Shots



In this episode I look at how I solved the problem of getting two actors off of a bus at separate times of the story. The location was the same, but the bus was only coming hourly. I found a way maximize my time as well as the resource of the city bus.

Press play!

4 comments:

Gautch said...

I wanted to thank you for this! You did great explaining it.

I have always felt that if an editor is also the director there is a higher chance for less "fix it in post" situations. Just you saying "...I'll be editing at this point..." shows your forethought.

Again thanks!

Joann said...

@GAUTCH OMG
IVE BEEN SAYING THAT SINCE I STARTED SCHOOL. PREACH ON

DIYFilmSchool.net said...

A good commentary on practical and provident filmmaking.

Without going too far into an editorial on coverage vs. getting only the shots you need, maximizing your shooting day and, even in this case, your actual setup can save time not only in production but in post, whether you edit your films or not.

Keeping a good shot log will help out an editor if the cuts aren't apparent in the footage itself.

This kind of shooting is explained in the making of "El Mariachi". Because of time, money and resources, Robert Rodriguez used each shot to get at least two or three angles of the sequence (save for action sequences).

Anonymous said...

Lesson learned: Shooters must think like editors. Bonus – I constructed your PVC camera stabilizer in one evening. You made it so easy. Even got the hockey tape and bicycle grips. Nice video. Thanks.

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