Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Make a Mic Shockmount for $1.20



This week we look at making a really affordable microphone shockmount for your boom pole. If a mic is mounted directly to the pole, any noise on that pole (such as hands moving back and forth) will be heard on the mic, polluting your audio recording. You need a shockmount which suspends the microphone away from the pole. The above video shows how.

Here's the Instructables version.

6 comments:

trunkstl said...

hey I really appreciate your website, I was wondering if you had a idea for shock mount that attaches to a hot shoe?

trunkstl said...

all of your videos have been very helpful, thank you.
I was hoping you had a idea on how to make that shock mount attach to a hot shoe on maybe say a GL2?

Scott Eggleston said...

I'd probably create an adapter by running the shockmount into a 1/2" PVC coupler, then a plug with a 1/4" hole drilled into it. Attach a "tripod screw to flash hot shoe mount" (check eBay) and you're all set!

Mike Desabrais said...

I am building a shotgun mic holder for the end of a broom handle or painters pole using this:

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/paint/brushes-roller-covers/mr-longarm/paint-brush-and-tool-holder-54543.html

I plan to attach it to a tube using hair ties or rubber bands as shock mounts. Total cost including pole about $30.

This design will be as good as any professional unit costing hundreds of dollars!!!!

LeeK said...

Hey Scott, I just found your site a few days ago while working on a new Faith Based film called "Preacher Man" by David Ford. I made your shock mount but before trying to "carve" the notches to hold the rubber bands I thought why not just drill 4 holes near each end and pass the rubber band through from both sides then take the ends and wrap them back around. This is easer and then only needs 4 total rubber bands as well. Thanks for your inspiration. We are currently using this on the end of a painters pole being that the "professional" one we were using was a loaner which was "recalled" by it's owner and the DIY one is working great. Thanks again.
Lee

DIYFilmSchool.net said...

As you were building this, I was thinking about what to use to keep the rubber bands in place. Then at the end you mentioned this issue and it turns out we were on the same page.

This build is great for its cost (next to nothing is always nice); just paint it black and you're good to go!